All in Film

To Be Human and Get Away With It

By Rachel Greben
Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow
is built as a fairy tale: the daughter, Sofia Scicolone, journeys far from home to achieve her calling as Sophia Loren, but the road home is treacherous. Relationships with both mother and mother country are beloved and complex. Growing up inhibited by poverty, war, and illegitimacy, Loren turns to the fairy-tale world of cinema not only as a means of opportunity, but also as a way of managing the drama of life.

They Can’t Touch Us

By Marlena Williams
Beneath its surface, The Entity is a film about sexual violence and the ways in which society silences the women who experience it, while keeping the men who perpetuate it hidden from view.

Who was Barbara Loden?

By Kate McCourt
”Wanda must rank as that cinematic rarity, a movie that really does get better—much better—as it goes along,” Roger Greenspun stated in his 1971 Times review of Barbara Loden’s first feature film as director. The film stands today as Loden’s sole produced work of feature-length writing, directing, and lead acting—she died of cancer at the age of forty-eight, nine years after Wanda’s release.

We Have Seen the Enemy, and It Is Television

By Tevis Eurythmic
Cinema hates television. In The Theory of the Novel, Georg Lukacs posits that there are true novels and fake novels—books labeled “a novel” that are really just narratives created to move mass units of recycled stereotypes and tired tropes. Visual depictions of small screens inside cinematic worlds in the 1970s and 1980s suggest cinema felt the same about television: that the “idiot box” is a fraudulent, socially corrosive form of visual storytelling—a cheap, fake version of cinema.